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You are here You are here: Home Home Nonviolence My Promise to Children
  My Promise to Children       by: Robert J. Burrowes
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Every day, human adults kill 35,000 of our children. We kill them in wars. We kill them with drones. We kill them in our homes. We also kill children in vast numbers by starving them to death in Africa, Asia and Central/South America because we use military violence to maintain an ‘economic’ system that allocates resources for military weapons, as well as corporate profits for the wealthy, instead of resources for living.

Apart from those children we kill every day, we sell many others into sexual slavery, we kidnap others to terrorize them into becoming child soldiers, we force others to work as slave laborers, in horrific conditions, in fields and factories (and buy the cheap products of their exploited labor as our latest ‘bargain’), and we condemn millions to live in poverty, homelessness and misery. We cause many children to be born with grotesque genetic deformities because we use horrific weapons, like those with depleted uranium, on their parents. We also inflict violence on children in many other forms, ranging from ‘ordinary’ domestic violence to genital mutilation. And we imprison vast numbers of children in school in the delusional belief that this is good for them. See ‘Do We Want School or Education?’ Whatever other damage that school does, it certainly helps to create the next generation of child-destroyers.

Despite all of the above, we adults still maintain our delusion that we humans love our children. And that we are civilized. Mind boggling!

Violence does not ‘just happen’

While some effort has been made by the international community to recognize that young human beings have needs (see, for example, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child), so far these efforts have failed to identify, and therefore meaningfully address, the primary reason why no child in the world today has their most fundamental needs met. This failure ensures that all of our other efforts to preserve and enhance life must ultimately fail, as our rush to extinction graphically illustrates. How can I say this? Consider this.

The man who inflicts violence on women was damaged during childhood. The white person who inflicts violence on people of colour was damaged during childhood. The employer who exploits workers was damaged during childhood. The individual who endorses the state violence inflicted on indigenous peoples was damaged during childhood. The terrorist, the political leader who wages war and the soldier who kills in our name were all damaged during childhood. The person who supports structures of violence (such as the military, police, legal and prison systems) was damaged during childhood. The person who supports structures of exploitation (such as capitalism and imperialism) was damaged during childhood. The person who thoughtlessly participates in destruction of the natural environment was damaged during childhood.

Violence does not ‘just happen’. It is perpetrated by damaged individuals, including ourselves. Or it is built into political, social and economic structures by damaged individuals, such as ourselves. So we have a choice. We can take responsibility for healing the damage done to ourselves. And we can take responsibility for ending the origin of all of this violence: the violence we adults inflict on children. Or we can continue to delude ourselves that there is another source of all of the violence in our world and devote more erroneous effort to addressing it.

Children’s and adolescents’ liberation movement

All violence is an outcome of the visible, ‘invisible’ and ‘utterly invisible’ violence inflicted by adults on children. See ‘Why Violence?’ Once the child has been damaged, they will inflict violence on themself, the people around them, as well as non-human species and the natural environment; they will also play a part in maintaining structures of violence and exploitation (such as the education and legal systems, as well as capitalism) in which they are both victim and perpetrator.

Where violence has been exposed in other contexts, it has led to liberation movements (such as the anti-slavery movement; the anti-war movement; struggles against imperialism, colonialism and racism; women’s liberation; struggles for the rights of indigenous peoples; the environment movement; animal liberation; struggles for the rights of people with disabilities; and the struggle against homophobia) as well as solidarity movements (in which, for example, whites have acted in solidarity with people of colour, pro-feminist men have acted in solidarity with women, and humans have acted in solidarity with non-human species and the natural environment).

Clearly, a children’s and adolescents’ liberation movement, by whatever name, is long overdue. And while an appropriate charter of young people’s needs might include many provisions contained in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, it must ultimately include fundamental provisions that identify the need to live without the fear and experience of adult violence in its many forms, and the need to be listened to and allowed to act in accord with their own Self-will, even when this conflicts with adult preferences. Until we are able to acknowledge and support these needs of children, we are deluding ourselves about the possibility of effectively tackling the military, ecological and economic threats to our survival. And time is clearly running out.

My Promise to Children

So, to all young people, everywhere, my promise is this:

I admit that I inflict violence on you, particularly when you have feelings that frighten me. I also admit that I do not listen to you and trust you when you tell me what you need because I like to pretend that I know better than you do or, and it’s scary for me to admit this, you might make choices that conflict with social norms or laws and I will have to make a stand with you, or even on your behalf.

From today, I promise that I will try to no longer inflict this violence on you, including that which I call ‘punishment’ so that I can pretend that I am not using violence, and I will do all that I can to stop other adults inflicting violence on you as well.

I also admit that we adults have done a bad job at looking after each other, including all of our children, and planet Earth, your home, and that you are going to have an increasingly difficult life as the natural world continues to break down. So I promise to participate in efforts being made to address all of these problems, such as that outlined in ‘The Flame Tree Project to Save Life on Earth’. You can do this with me, if you like.

I will also let you make all of your choices freely in the same way that I expect to make mine. If you make mistakes, if you change your mind, I will accept these as part of your learning and growing. (I still make mistakes and change my mind too although I like to pretend that I don’t!) This means, for example, that if you tell me that you do not want to go to school (where I know that other adults will tell you what to do in violation of your Self-will), then I will not force you to do so. There are better ways of learning and we can work out together how you might go about doing this.

If we have differences about what to do, I promise that I will talk about it with you until we find a way forward that seems fair to us both. When I was a child, the adults in my life didn’t give me much choice about what I did, so I am scared that talking about something means that ‘no-one will listen’ and I won’t get what I want. But I will try to trust that if I talk honestly to you about what I need, then you will listen carefully and help me to get what I need as well. I sort of know that if I listen and I am fair to you, and I trust you to listen and to be fair with me, then you will learn to listen and be fair with everyone. But this is hard for me. Conflict has often been scary.

I will not presume that you are less capable than I am, even though you are younger. I will treat you like an equal, just as we adults like to be treated as equals.

I will be honest with you about how I feel and what I need.

Most importantly of all, I promise that I will listen to you as best I can. See ‘Nisteling: The Art of Deep Listening’. I get scared when you are scared, angry or sad but part of me knows that you need to feel scared, angry or sad (or something else) when things don’t work out as you want, just as you will sometimes feel content, loving or happy when things do work out. Of course, it is easier for me to listen when you are content, loving and happy, and I wish that you were like that all of the time! But life isn’t like that hey? I also get scared when you tell me that your Dad/Mum or someone I think is our friend is abusing you but I will do my best to listen to and support you to defend yourself against this violence, one way or another. In my heart, I know that listening means listening to however you are and letting that guide what you do. In the adult world, however, this just isn’t easy to do every day. But I will try! This means, then, that I will also not try to scare you out of telling me the truth when I don’t like it, including your truth about me!

From today, in a nutshell, I promise that I will support you to act in accord with your own Self-will. I want you to be free and to be everything that you were born to be.

Oh, and finally, as best I can, I promise to love you and to respect you as a unique, beautiful and compassionate creation with a great deal to offer the world (as long as adults don’t get in your way). You are, indeed, a child of the Universe. You do, indeed, have a right to be here.

As an adult

As an adult, would you be willing to make this promise too? To whom would you make it?

If you are not willing to make this promise, what does this tell you about yourself?

There is no doubt that giving every child (or adult, for that matter) all of the space they need to feel, deeply, what they want to do, and to then let them do it (or to have the feelings they naturally have if someone or something prevents them from doing so) will have some dysfunctional outcomes in the short term. This is because we have all been dysfunctionalized, to a greater or lesser extent, by the violence we have already suffered throughout our lives. But listening deeply to a child from birth (or starting today), and supporting them to act out their own Self-will, will lead to an infinitely better overall outcome than the system of emotional suppression, control and punishment of children which has generated the incredibly violent world in which we now find ourselves.

It will, of course, be difficult for some form of young people’s liberation movement to emerge given the extraordinary level of violence which children suffer and their economic dependence on adults. However, many social contexts still provide some space, and social media might offer new opportunities, for political organization by young people. Until they do organize politically, those adults who wish to act in solidarity with children can readily do so by doing any or all of the following seven things.

Act in solidarity with children

First, like some individual members of other violent/oppressive groups before you (such as anti-racist whites and pro-feminist men who sought to eliminate their own racism/sexism), you could take responsibility for identifying and progressively eliminating your own violence against children (using the information in ‘Why Violence?’ above as a guide or, preferably, by listening to children).

Second, you could raise awareness of violence against children and challenge/support others, including institutions, to take responsibility for ending their violence against children (perhaps by asking them to consider making the ‘Promise to Children’ above).

Third, you could listen to children (in silence) with patience, love and compassion when children feel safe to talk of (or otherwise reveal, perhaps through some form of artistic expression) their experience of violence and to express their feelings (including fear, anger, sadness and others) about this violence.

Fourth, you could organize a safe forum (facilitated by someone experienced in listening to emotionally-disturbing events) in which a few children could share with each other (by talking or through some form of artistic expression) their experiences of, and feelings about, the violence they have suffered and witnessed.

Fifth, you could support children’s efforts to communicate and organize around the issue of adult violence against children.

Sixth, you could support children to take action against adult violence when those children feel courageous enough to act (or you could act on the child’s behalf when the child is too young or too terrified to act for itself).

Finally, you could act in solidarity with the child in yourself. You were a victim as a child and no one acted in solidarity with you. You can learn to listen to yourself while you have your feelings about violent childhood experiences or you can get someone else you trust to listen to you about what happened to you. In time, this will make you better able to listen to, and be an ally of, children (even when they tell you about your violence against them).

If you wish to join the worldwide movement to end all violence, including violence against children, you can sign online ‘The People’s Charter to Create a Nonviolent World’.

It takes courage to tell the truth that no-one wants to hear.
It takes fearlessness to act on it.

About the Author

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Robert Burrowes 1918-1942

Who Am I?

My father had two brothers: his older brother, Robert, and his twin brother, Thomas. Both were killed in World War II.

Bob was a soldier in the 34th Fortress Engineers of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). He was captured during the fall of Rabaul on 22 January 1942, held prisoner and half-starved at the Malaguna Road camp until he was put on the Japanese prisoner-of-war ship Montevideo Maru in late June. On 1 July 1942, the unmarked and unescorted Montevideo Maru was torpedoed off Luzon by the USS Sturgeon. The ship sank in six minutes. All 1,053 Australian prisoners of war were killed: it was Australia’s largest single loss of life in a single incident during the entire war. You can read Bob’s final letter by clicking on ‘Final Letters’ in the sidebar. I am named after this uncle.

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Thomas Burrowes 1923-1943

Tom was a wireless air gunner on a Beaufort Bomber (popularly but irreverently known as ‘flying coffins’) in the RAAF’s 100 Squadron. He was shot down over Rabaul on his first mission on 14 December 1943. You can read Tom’s final letter by clicking on ‘Final Letters’ in the sidebar. My brother is named after this uncle.

My great uncle, Thomas Ince Farrell, was a soldier in the 16th Battalion of the AIF in World War I. He was killed in action at Pope’s Hill, Gallipoli ‘on or about’ 2 May 1915.

Another great uncle, Leslie Burrowes, was a trooper in the 10th Light Horse Regiment of the AIF in World War I. He was wounded in action three times at Gallipoli and died prematurely some years after the Great War.

In 1966, the year I turned 14, I decided that I would devote my life to answering two questions – Why are human beings violent? How can this violence be ended? – and taking action based on the learning that I would do by seeking answers to these two questions. This is more than a life passion: It is why I live.

Apart from three decades of involvement in nonviolent action campaigns, therefore, I have been engaged in an ongoing research effort since 1966 to find answers to these two questions.

The most important documents that have arisen from this research and nonviolent activism are as follows. Together they constitute an integrated and comprehensive strategy to end human violence and prevent human extinction:

The People’s Charter to Create a Nonviolent World The Nonviolence Charter was launched simultaneously around the world on 11 November 2011; it invites all people to join a worldwide movement to end violence in all of its forms.

Why Violence? This document offers a comprehensive explanation of why human beings are violent. It took me 41 years to learn the central insight that generated this document, now in its 8th edition. It is the primary outcome of 14 years of deep psychological investigation undertaken, while living in seclusion, by my soulmate and research colleague, Anita McKone, and myself from 1996 until 2010. Anita’s website, which includes her explanation of our process during this period – ‘Fearless Psychology and Fearful Psychology’ – and her songs of nonviolence, can be viewed here: AM.

The Flame Tree Project to Save Life on Earth This document outlines a comprehensive strategy to end human violence (including environmental destruction) and prevent human extinction. It was written in conjunction with Anita.

The Strategy of Nonviolent Defense: A Gandhian Approach This book explains how to resist and defeat any form of military violence by using a strategy of nonviolent defence. I have presented the essence of this strategic thinking on the Nonviolent Defense/Liberation Strategy website. You can learn how to plan and implement a nonviolent defense or liberation strategy from this website.

Nonviolent Campaign Strategy This website describes how to plan and implement a nonviolent strategy to achieve a peace, environmental or social justice outcome.

The Political Objective and Strategic Goal of Nonviolent Actions This article explains the vital distinction, which is virtually never understood, between the political objective and the strategic goal of all nonviolent actions. It was originally published in Nonviolence Today 48, January-February 1996. pp. 6-7 but was republished in 2014. It will give you a taste of the strategic thinking mentioned above.

Nonviolent Action: Minimizing the Risk of Violent Repression This article explains 20 things that nonviolent activists can do to minimise the risk of military, police and provocateur violence at nonviolent actions. It was originally published under the title Minimising the Risk of Police Violence in Nonviolence Today 40, September-October 1994. pp. 17-18 but was revised for republication in 2014.

Nonviolent Intervention in Interpersonal Conflict This article explains how to safely and nonviolently intervene in violent conflicts between other individuals/groups. It was published in Nonviolence Today 44, May-June 1995. pp. 4-6.

You can see a more complete list of my publications by clicking on ‘Publications’ in the sidebar.

I spent five years working (full-time) as Honorary State Secretary of The Royal Life Saving Society – Australia, Victoria Branch from 1975-1981, during which I developed the philosophy and core content of what became known, in 1982, as the ‘Swim and Survive’ learner swimmer scheme. This scheme has substantially reduced the drowning toll in Australia.

One of the many instructive experiences of my life was the time I spent working in the Shagarab East 2 Refugee Camp in eastern Sudan in 1985. This camp held 20,000 Tigrayan refugees who had just fled the Ethiopian war and famine. I was part of a Community Aid Abroad (Oxfam in Australia) refugee health team. Despite our best efforts, 5 people died in our camp every day. On one occasion, I was urgently summoned to perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (at which I had been expertly trained during my years as a lifesaver) on an emaciated three month old baby while her distraught parents looked on. I could not save her.

Since 1981, I have been involved in many nonviolent action campaigns in relation to peace, environmental and social justice issues. These include refusing to vote (since 1981), the Franklin River Blockade (1982-1983), the campaign to end nuclear warship visits to Australian ports (1987-1988), the campaign to remove US military bases from Australian soil (1989), campaigns to halt the destruction of old-growth forests in south-eastern Australia (1989-1990) and the campaign to end duck shooting (1989-1990).

My involvement in these and other campaigns has led to my arrest on about 25 occasions and to brief terms of imprisonment on about 15, including one in which I was imprisoned in a psychiatric ward and forcibly injected with ‘anti-psychotic’ drugs. During each of these terms of imprisonment, I have fasted until it was time for my release or I was given the organically/biodynamically grown, vegetarian wholefood that I had requested. There have been many other outcomes from my involvement in these campaigns, including the learning I did which enabled me to write and publish strategic analyses of many of them: see relevant articles in the list of publications.

Apart from the campaigns just mentioned, however, the three campaigns in which I have been most heavily involved are as follows:

War Tax Resistance: I have been a conscientious war tax resister since 1983. Among many outcomes, this has led to the seizure of my bank account in 1984, my bankruptcy in 1991, my conviction for contempt of court (because of my conscientious refusal to cooperate with the bankruptcy trustee) in 1992, and the seizure of my passport in 1993. You can read my defence presentation to the Federal Court of Australia during my bankruptcy trial by clicking on ‘Court Defence’ in the sidebar.

Melbourne Rainforest Action Group: I was heavily involved in the nonviolent action campaign of the Melbourne Rainforest Action Group in 1988-1990. This campaign was extremely effective, substantially reducing Australia’s imports of rainforest timber from South East Asia, thus slowing rainforest destruction in that region. There is a video of this campaign, which includes graphic footage of nonviolent actions and a brief explanation of the group’s nonviolent strategy by me:

Gulf Peace Team: I was a member of the international Gulf Peace Team – the 73 people from 16 countries who camped on the border between Iraq and Saudi Arabia in an attempt to prevent the Gulf War in January 1991. I wrote a strategic analysis of this experience in ‘The Persian Gulf War and the Gulf Peace Team’ in Yeshua Moser-Puangsuwan and Thomas Weber (eds.) Nonviolent Intervention Across Borders: A Recurrent Vision (Honolulu: University of Hawai’i, 2000). I also wrote the typology of nonviolent intervention on which this book is based: ‘Cross-border Nonviolent Intervention: A Typology’. I did a television interview about the Gulf Peace Team on 1 February 1991, just hours after we arrived in Amman from Baghdad:

Apart from the websites mentioned above, I maintain the Global Nonviolence Network (GNN) website. The GNN lists nonviolence organisations by region and country around the world: GNN.

So who am I? I am my two uncles and hundreds of thousands of Iraqis killed in war. I am the refugees who died in the Shagarab East 2 Refugee Camp. And I am the wildlife and trees destroyed in the rainforests of South East Asia. Who else could I be?

The purpose of violence is to suppress awareness of the truth.

…..

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Beryl 1943

Acknowledgements

I would like to express my deep gratitude to my parents, Beryl & James, veterans of World War II, who have never failed to find the love and financial support that I have needed to undertake my life’s work.

 

 

 

 

 

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James Burrowes 1942

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Beryl & James Burrowes

 

They are truly the greatest parents of all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many others have helped at times and I deeply appreciate their support. If you would like to help Anita’s and my work to end human violence, please consider financially supporting us by clicking on ‘Financial Support’ in the sidebar.

rjb pho 08aag 136

Robert J. Burrowes
P.O. Box 68
Daylesford
Victoria 3460
Australia
Email: 

Websites



 ■ Nonviolence Charter

 ■ Flame Tree Project to Save Life on Earth

 ■ Why Violence?

 ■ Nonviolent Campaign Strategy

 ■ Nonviolent Defense/Liberation Strategy

 ■ Anita: Songs of Nonviolence

 ■ Robert

 ■ Global Nonviolence Network

Nonviolence

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My Promise to Children

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  My Promise to Children       by: Robert J. Burrowes Every day, human adults kill 35,000 of our children. We kill them in wars. We kill them with drones. We kill them in our homes. We also kill children in vast numbers by starving them to death in Africa, Asia and Central/South America because we use military violence to maintain an ‘economic’ system that allocates resources for military weapons, as well as corporate profits for the wealthy, instead of resources for living. Apart from those children we kill every day, we sell many others into sexual slavery, we kidnap others to terrorize them into becoming child...

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  Why Violence?      (ver. 8)       by: Robert J. Burrowes This document offers a comprehensive explanation of why human beings are violent. It took me 41 years to learn the central insight that generated this document, now in its 8th edition.   (click HERE for ver. 9) It is the primary outcome of 14 years of deep psychological investigation undertaken, while living in seclusion, by my soulmate and research colleague, Anita McKone, and myself from 1996 until 2010. Anita’s website, which includes her explanation of our process during this period – ‘Fearless Psychology and Fearful Psychology’ – and her songs of nonviolence, can be viewed here: AM.

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